Arbiter

Arbiter. Magazine of fashion and style founded in the immediate post-war period. From the start, the contribution of Michelangelo Testa was crucial.

Arbiter. Magazine of fashion and style founded in the immediate post-war period. From the start, the contribution that Michelangelo Testa made to the magazine was crucial.

Arbiter
Michelangelo Testa.

He was hired in 1946 as an editor and within a few months became editor-in-chief and director. Testa turned Arbiter into a magazine with great ambitions, working with the most important journalists and illustrators.

Arbiter in the 50s

The covers done by Paolo Garretto are still famous.The traditional emphasis on information and trends, especially in men’s fashion, was expanded to include all the most important areas of stylistic and artistic production.

Arbiter
Some Arbiter covers.

In the 1950s the magazine played a prominent role in the industrial development of Italian fashion and design. An important event in that history was a meeting in 1951 between textile mills, clothing manufacturers, journalists, and members of the new advertising industry. They met in order to consider the possibility of an absolutely new initiative, a show devoted to men’s fashion.

At the end of the 1960s, Arbiter was taken over by Rusconi Editore. But without Testa’s enthusiasm and leadership, the magazine lost both readers and credibility, and ceased publication. A few years later it was back on the newsstands with a different name, Il Piacere.

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Anna

Anna. Italian women’s weekly published by Rizzoli. It was started in 1984 from a radical restyling of Annabella, a famous magazine.

Anna. Italian women’s weekly published by Rizzoli. It was started in 1984 from a radical restyling of Annabella, a famous magazine which that suffered a deep crisis at the end of the 1970s. Its troubles were evident in the rapid succession of six editors-in-chief in less than ten years: Benedetto Mosca, Paolo Occhipinti, Luciana Omicini, Maria Venturi, Willy Molco, and Carla Gabetti.

In December 1989, another terrible year for the weekly, sales of Anna hit 215,000 copies, their lowest ever. In that year the editorship was given to Mirella Pallotti, who oversaw another restyling of form and content.

Anna
Une of the covers of the magazine, when it was still called Annabella.

The magazine became more like the latest version of Grazia, a competing weekly published by Mondadori, with more space for culture and news. Sales began to rise again and reached 367,000 copies in 1992.

Then, starting in 1995, there was a new decline, and the editorship was entrusted to Edvige Bernasconi, who had been successful at Donna Moderna, published by Mondadori. With her, sales returned to more than 300,000 copies.
In February 2003 the editorship passes from Edvige Bernasconi to Rosellina Salemi, formerly deputy-editor for news.

In 2005 the editorship passed to Maria Latella, while in May 2006 Anna changed its name to A.

Anna
One of the weekly’s covers, after it had already changed its name from Anna to A.

The last publication of the weekly was in July 2013.

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Arena Magazine

Arena Magazine. English magazine of news and men’s fashion. Founded in London in 1986 by Nick Logan, the very clever inventor of The Face.

Arena Magazine. English magazine of news and men’s fashion. Founded in London in 1986 by Nick Logan, the very clever inventor of The Face. Additionally Logan sensed that a new audience had formed. Young urban males with excellent jobs, a lot of money and a desire for the latest trends. Adopting the popular and well-tested editorial model of the women’s magazines, he offered articles about fashion, culture, cinema, travel and a bit of news.

The magazine’s agenda was to bring prominence to men’s magazines, that were usually decked the top shelves in the 80’s. Nick Langdon owned Arena, with an investment from Conde Nast. The distinctive layouts for Arena, popularising Helvetica typeface, were designed by Neville Brody, who previously worked on The Face

Arena Magazine
Nick Logan, Arena Magazine’s founder.

Top photographers and a winning graphic completed the picture. During the 1990s Arena Magazine was updated and became a bit New Age. More spiritual and more thoughtful about the world, but without dropping its fundamentally consumer orientation.

Arena’s history

Peter Howarth, a later Arena editor said “there was no conscious decision to make a male version of existing women’s magazines. ‘Nick Logan, launched The Face in 1980 because it was a magazine he wanted to read. But six years on he wanted to read a different magazine because he had moved on – as had all The Face readers – so he decided to do a men’s magazine. It was never really a gap in the market; he just wanted to make the sort of magazine he wanted to read”.

Soon after Arena was launched, it caused a media stir. It was received with great enthusiasm, gained a circulation of more than 65,000 copies in its first year. Arena’s commercial success as a new age magazine for men, that didn’t involve pronographic depictions was percieved as publishing wizardry. At the peak of its run, Arena sold more than 93,000 copies in 1990.

The popularity amassed by Arena’s first year run incited Conde Nast to launch the British version of GQ magazine in the next year. Arena and GQ were seen as consistently competing for readership till the end of 1990’s, when GQ beat Arena in a game of relevance .

In early 90’s, Arena and GQ steered clear of being stereotyped along with other men’s magazine of publishing titillating women on the cover. They continued with men on the cover. This included actors John Hurt and Terence Stamp, and high-achievers such as broadcaster John Birt, musician Peter Gabriel and writer Martin Amis. In the later years, Arena drifted from the original ethos, becoming a grubby display for nude female forms.

Arena Magazine
Daniel Graig x Arena Magazine.

Nick Langdon and Wagadon Publishing sold Arena to Emap in 1999, after Conde Nast withdrew from the title.

Arena Magazine from 2000 to today

Arena revamped their content and relaunched in 2007. With David Beckham gracing the covering and the introduction of new sections on Intelligence (current affairs), Handbook (a consumer guide), Review (on culture) and Life (on travel), the initiative was intended to boost Arena’s then prolonging slump. The relaunch brought in Giles Hattersley as the new editor and a new vision –

“authoritative monthly bible that arms its readers with both the sharpest looks and opinions.It will resonate with and reflect the lifestyles of young men today – the ‘me generation’ – who earn more, dress better, party harder and are better educated than at any other time in history”.

Bauer Media, acquired Arena from EMAP in 2008. The following year’s sales decline and monthly circulation showed the revamp’s failure. Citing the abysmal sales of less than 20,000 copies a month in 2008, Arena magazine ceased publishing in 2009, after 22 years since its inception. The final issue was released on 12th march 2009. Arena’s international issues (Denmark, Ukraine, Korea, Thailand, Singapore) and their bi-annaual Arena Homme continued to be published.

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Alain-Bernard, Catherine

Alain-Bernard Catherine (1944-2016). French journalist. In January 1992 she became director of the monthly magazine Dépèche Mode.

Alain-Bernard Catherine (1944-2016). French journalist. In January 1992 she became director of the monthly magazine Dépèche Mode, changing both the content and its appearance. She updated the layout and reduced the cover price, dedicating 50% of its pages exclusively to fashion and limiting coverage of the news.

Alain-Bernard
Dépèche mode.

Alain-Bernard began her career in 1967, working for several magazines, including Mademoiselle. Furthermore in 1972 Elisabeth Bernigaud appointed her chief-editor of Dépèche Mode Professionel. Four years later, the two of them created Dépèche Mode Grand Public, which they directed together. From 1977 to 1991 she worked with Elle, Madame Figaro and Nouveau Figaro.
Catherine died on January 1, 2016 from cancer at the age of 71.

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Arianna

Arianna. Italian monthly published by Mondadori from 1957 to 1973. Starting with its first issue, published in April with Rosanna Armani on the cover,

Arianna. Italian monthly published by Mondadori from 1957 to 1973. Starting with its first issue, published in April with Rosanna Armani on the cover, Arianna tried to focus on a readership of young women mostly out on their own and independent of their family. The magazine was one of several innovative editorial initiatives by Mondadori, of which the weekly Epoca was the centerpiece. It was also part of a comprehensive redesign undertaken in order to confront strong competition from the magazines published by Rizzoli. Lamberto Sechi was the founder and director of the magazine, and later would be the director of Panorama. Gianni Baldi became his successor.

Arianna
Lamberto Sechi.

After a period of moderate success, sales began to drop. The crisis was irreversible and in a sense the magazine practically disappeared, as due to a total restyling the magazine returned to the newsstands with a completely different layout under the name Cosmopolitan-Arianna as a large-format paper taking a teasing look at the moderate areas of feminism.

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