Balla, Giacomo

Balla Giacomo (1871-1958). Italian painter. In May 1914 he signed the Manifesto of the Futurist Men’s Suit in which he theorized the Transformable Suit.

Balla Giacomo (1871-1958). Italian painter. In May 1914 he signed the Manifesto del vestito maschile futurista (Manifesto of the Futurist Men’s Suit) in which he theorized the Vestito Trasformabile (Transformable Suit). It is a suit that could be modified by attaching fabric of different colors and shapes by means of snap fasteners.

The first Futurist suit is, according to the painter,  “dynamic, aggressive, annoying, strong-willed, violent, flying, agile, joyful, illuminating, phosphorescent”. But the first clothes created by the artist, in a large or fine checkered pattern, characterized by a basic but dynamic cut, came out in 1912.

Balla
Futurism and suits.

Balla and the futuristic movement

One of the masters of the Futurist Movement, he was very interested in clothing, considering it as a radical, futurist renewal of life. Moreover this lead to his Manifesto per la Ricostruzione Futurista dell’Universo (Manifesto for the Futurist Reconstruction of the Universe), signed in 1915 together with his fellow-artist Depero. Then starting in the 1920s, Balla created suits, ties, waistcoats, tapestries, fans, bags and hats in which the lines of velocity in his painting are transformed into extravagant arabesques and geometric decorations of vivid and contrasting colors.

Each one is a unique piece and was created by the artist at his home in Rome, with the help of his daughters Luce and Elica. Furthermore some very important pieces belong to the Biagiotti-Cigna Collection (Guidonia) and to the Coen and Pieroni Collection in Pescara.

It might also interest you: 

Bakst, Léon

Balla Giacomo, futurist

Acconci, Vito

Vito Acconci (1940-2017). Italian-American artist born in New York in the Bronx. Among the first exponents of that branch of Conceptual Art.

Vito Acconci (1940-2017). Italian-American artist born in New York in the Bronx. Among the first exponents of that branch of Conceptual Art known as Behavioral Art. He always considered the experience of the body as fundamental to his work (performance art, photography, and sculpture).

For this reason he created sculpture in the shape of garments, such as his installation at the Museo Pecci in Prato in 1991. Here six gigantic brassieres with cups made of wire netting and plastered fabric were adjusted by shoulder straps made of steel cables.

In 1993 he created Shirt/Jacket of Pockets, a jacket of transparent plastic made of pockets joined together by zippers. Leaf Shirt was done in 1985: a green leaf-covered shirt as a symbol of the deep connection between nature and the human body.

Acconci
Shirt/jacket of pockets.

He has taught at prestigious art and design institutes in Halifax, Chicago, California, at Yale University, and also lectures at the College of Brooklyn.

One of his latest works is Lobby-for-the-Time-Being. It is an installation in the North Wing Lobby of the Bronx Museum of the Arts. The installation occupies the building’s atrium with a white Corian mesh, creating a long undulating wall similar to giant snowflakes.

Acconci
Lobby-for-the-time-being.

In 2014 Acconci is the protagonist of a video produced by Marc Santo. Here he talks about some of his projects that have never been completed.

Vito Acconci passed away on April 27, 2017 in Manhattan, New York.

It might also interest you: 

Abate, Loris