Bailey, Xenobia

Bailey Xenobia (1955). American milliner. She favors crochet work for her unisex hats whose shape and color combinations are inspired by Africa.

Bailey Xenobia (1955). American milliner. Bailey was born in Seattle, WA and studied ethnomusicology at the University of Washington. In a career that began in the 1980s, she also created hats for Spike Lee’s film Do The Right Thing (1989). She favors crochet work for her unisex hats whose shape and color combinations are inspired by Africa and the artists of Brooklyn. Moreover Bailey is best known for her eclectic crochet hats and large scale crochet mandalas, consisting of colorful concentric circles and repeating patterns.

In recent years the designer has moved in the direction of art work and away from the world of fashion. One example is the project Paradise Under Reconstruction in the Aesthetic of Funk. Complicated crochet work is used in a way that recalls the folk art of America and Africa.

Xenobia is also a cultural activist.

n 2003, her designs were featured in an Absolut Vodka advertisement entitled “Absolut Bailey”. Moreover her hats have been featured on United Colors of Benetton ads and on The Cosby Show.

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Adrian

Art Agency Cerratelli

Art Agency Cerratelli. Tailor shop providing costumes for the theater and film, opened in Florence in 1919 by Arturo Cerratelli.

Art Agency Cerratelli. Tailor shop providing costumes for the theater and film, opened in Florence in 1919 on the initiative of the baritone Arturo Cerratelli. He was oe of the first performers in La Bohème.

It is the oldest in Italy. Furthermore it has always belonged to the Cerratelli family, whose members work there. It has worked on countless plays, operas, and films. Many costume designers have made use of its expertise, among them Sensani, Anna Anni, Maria De Matteis, Danilo Donati, Marcel Escoffier, Ezio Frigerio, and Pier Luigi Pizzi.

It first worked in the cinema with An Adventure of Salvator Rosa, followed by El Cid, A Room With A View and many films by Franco Zeffirelli, from The Taming of the Shrew to Brother Sun, Sister Moon.Moreover the firm’s story was told in 1972 in an exhibition at Palazzo Strozzi in Florence.

Costumes by Art Agency Cerratelli have been an important part of many other exhibitions, including Visuality of May (Florence, Forte di Belvedere, 1979), Franco Zeffirelli (Tokyo, Seibu, 1989), The Enchanting Artifice between Music and Vision. The Melodrama in Cinema (Milan, Museo della Scala, 1995-1996), Sensani (San Casciano dei Bagni, 1998).

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Academy of Fashion and Costume Design

Asta Lustig, Olga

Asta Lustig, Olga (1880-1963). A very important figure in the history of embroidery and lace in the 20th century. Born in Venice, Olga Lustig went to work at a very young age as a shop assistant in the lace firm Jesurum, another legendary name in the industry. At 19 she married Giosuè Asta, an officer in the merchant marine.

The first Asta shop

A little later, in the early 1900s, she opened her first small shop in Piazza San Marco. An almost immediate success allowed her to expand the business and gave her three shop windows under the archway of the Procuratie Vecchie. She used to say that she was totally unable to do any sewing work. But she was extremely skilled in designing ensembles for bridal veils, tablecloths, table decorations and sheets. The design department was located in the back of the shop. After making a sketch she prepared a final model that, reviewed and corrected, would be given to the embroiderers and lace makers.

Asta
Asta shop.

Since the 1920s Olga found herself faced with the problem of a trade — lace embroidery, with bobbin and with needle — that was threatened by progress. Her solution was to open in Burano a school of lacemaking so that the tradition would not die.

Milan, Costa Azzurra and St. Moritz

Before the war, she opened a branch of the school in Milan on Corso Littorio (today Corso Matteotti), directed until its closing at the beginning of the 1960s by Bianca Kalberg and Amalia Vernocchi. Olga sold her products also in the CÂte d’Azur and St. Moritz. She was a supplier to the royal family and numbered among her clients Barbara Hutton, King Farouk (who ordered for his wife a trousseau that is still famous for its opulence), the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Douglas Fairbanks, William Powell, Myrna Loy and the families of the Italian aristocracy and upper class. She always shared the profits of the firm with her employees, long before profit-sharing became part of the strategy of unions.

When she died in 1963 the firm was already in trouble, as the times and what people wore had changed. The firm could not survive much longer, and when it closed, her designs were scattered.

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Audibet, Marc

Avolio, Giorgio

Avolio Giorgio. Milanese tailor. He exhibited, together with Bertoli and Pucci, at the Tessitrice dell’Isola, the fashion boutique.

Avolio Giorgio. Milanese tailor. He exhibited, together with Bertoli and Pucci, at the Tessitrice dell’Isola, the fashion boutique at the first show organized by Giorgini in Florence at the birth of Italian fashion on February 12, 1951. His style was completely opposite the very fanciful one of Bertoli: raincoats, women’s suits in check patterns, dull colours, and white blouses. Classicism was his trademark. His atelier was in via San Damiano, in Milan.

Furthermore his collections were characterized by the use of sober and classic cuts, materials and colors. He is a very important figure in the Florentine panorama and in the world of fashion. He also participates in missions in Europe and the United States promoted, at the end of the 1950s, by the Ministry of Foreign Trade and organized by the Italian Fashion Center in Milan, founded in 1948.

Then in the 1960s, Avolio presented its collections at Samia. His contribution to Italian fashion was fundamental in transforming the boutique into an autonomous genre.

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Arzano, Mario

Mario Arzano (1939). Neapolitan tailor. He is the son of art. In 1973 he took over his mother’s atelier in via dei Mille.

Arzano Mario (1939). Tailor born in Naples who continued the family business. In 1973 he took over his mother’s atelier in via dei Mille. He has a staff of 12 assistants. He designs French haute couture, buying patterns and fabrics from Ungaro and Saint-Laurent, among others. In recent years he also created his own line of high fashion for women, taking advantage of the high quality of craftsmanship in Naples.

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Antonelli, Maria

Antonelli Maria (1903-1969). Italian haute-couture dressmaker. As a young girl she was fascinated by fashion and apprenticed at Battilocchi taylor shop.

Antonelli Maria (1903-1969). Italian haute-couture dressmaker, born in Siena. The daughter of an employee at the Quirinale, as a young girl she was fascinated by fashion and apprenticed at the dressmaker Battilocchi in Rome. She later went out on her own and by the early 1940’s had become famous. She was dressing stars of the Italian cinema who chose her dresses because of their originality. These included Clara Calamai, Alida Valli, and Mariella Lotti.

In 1947 she designed a wedding dress for the English actress Dawn Addams, who, to the jubilation of the illustrated magazines and the first paparazzi, married Prince Massimo. Bista Giorgini invited her to participate in the first Made in Italy fashion shows in Florence. She is considered a pioneer of Italian fashion.

Antonelli
One of Antonelli Maria’s creations.

In her atelier worked designers such as Pino Pascali, Elio Costanzi, Mario Vigolo, Chino Bert and, for evening dresses, a very young Pino Lancetti. At the end of the 1940s, the set and costume designer Giulio Coltellacci created for her a collection inspired by the colors of the roofs of Rome. Then in 1958 she launched a prêt-à-porter line under the name Antonelli Sport. The contribution of her collaborator André Laug was decisive. The Dinamica line, inspired by the world of technoloy, was created in 1963, followed by the Fuso and Optical lines.

When Laug quit to go out on his own, his place was taken by Silvano Malta, who designed a very successful retro line with pastel colors and draping fabrics. In 1969 Maria became ill and passed away shortly after. When she died her shop died with her.

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Annenkov, Yuri Pavlovich

Annenkov Yuri Pavlovich (1901-1974). Costume designer from Russia. Born in Petropavlovsk, he worked on the scenery for the first great revolutionary shows.

Annenkov Yuri Pavlovich (1901-1974). Costume designer from Russia. Born in Petropavlovsk, he worked on the scenery for the first great revolutionary shows and attended the Meyerhold theater school. In 1924 he abandoned Russia for Germany, where he began to work for the cinema, designing the costumes for F.W. Murnau’s Faust. Later he worked principally in France, changing his first name to Georges. He collaborated with Marcel L’Herbier (L’Affaire du Collier de la Reine), Jean Delannoy (L’Eternel Retour, Symphonie Pastorale) and, above all, with Max Ophüls, designing costumes for his masterpieces (Le Plaisir, Madame de…, and Lola Montès, for which he and Marcel Escoffier designed the costumes of Martine Carol). He also worked in Italy, on Giacomo Gentilomo’s Due Orfanelle. In 1951 Annenkov published an autobiography entitled En habillant les vedettes (Dressing the Stars).

Annenkov
Annenkov Yuri in a self-portrait (1910).

Annenkov Yury has also devoted himself to art during his career.

During his time in Paris he had the opportunity to deepen his knowledge with the young painters Marc Chagall and Henri Matisse, who influenced him significantly. In fact, with Marc Chagall he had attended Savely Seidenberg’s classes when they were at university.

He died on July 12, 1974 in Paris, France.

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Bardot, André

André Bardot. French tailor for men, with an atelier in Paris. They clothed Jean Cocteau and Jean Marais. They became famous in the 1950s.

André Bardot. French tailor for men, with an atelier in Paris. They clothed Jean Cocteau and Jean Marais. They became famous in the 1950s for their anti-conformist style which broke with classic standards.

André Bardot
A man wearing a coat by André Bardot.

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Anderson, Milo

Anderson Milo (1912-1984). American costume designer, particularly skilled in the creation of historical costumes. He dressed Olivia De Havilland.

Anderson Milo (1912-1984). American costume designer, particularly skilled in the creation of historical costumes. He dressed Olivia De Havilland in some of Warner Brothers’s greatest successes, such as Captain Blood, The Charge of the Light Brigade, and The Adventures of Robin Hood.

Anderson made his début at the age of 20 at Goldwyn Pictures, designing stage costumes for vaudeville artist Eddie Cantor. He later signed a contract with Warner Bros., where he remained until 1952. Many female stars considered him their favorite costume designer. It is enough to remember the red dress that Bette Davis wore in Jezebel, Joan Crawford’s exciting outfits in Mildred Pierce, and Lauren Bacall‘s charming make-up in Young Man With A Horn. After leaving the world of film, he dedicated himself successfully to interior decor.

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Anderson, Garrick

Anderson Garrick (1944). American tailor. He opened his own atelier in New York in 1978, after working some time for Jones.

Anderson Garrick (1944). American tailor. He opened his atelier in New York in 1978, after working some time for Jones. He began his activity in partnership with Virginia Marshall, focusing on the quality and elegance of imported fabrics. His made-to-measure clothes adapt the English style to the American man. Tailoring is his strong suit, but he also started a prêt-à-porter line that is on sale in major department stores like Saks.

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