Baccarat

Baccarat. In 1764 King Louis XV of France gave the Bishop of Montmorency-Laval of Metz permission to found a house that produced glass and crystal.

Baccarat. In 1764, King Louis XV of France gave the Bishop of Montmorency-Laval of Metz the permission to found a house.  The house produced glass and crystal in Baccarat, in eastern France.

Baccarat is famous for its crystal creations made especially for the home.

The brand itself managed to survive until 1993. When it launched the first line of jewelry with two collections a year. Baccarat’s creations have achieved great success thanks to the work of the Meilleurs Ouvriers de France, the greatest French artists and craftsmen.

The Baccarat collections

The collections offer both replicas of antique pieces and new elements created by young designers. These include Jean-Marie Massaud, Caroline Bouzinac and Jean Oddes.

In 2001, a line of crystal jewels embellished with semiprecious and precious stones called Les Précieux was launched. Then the following year, in 2003, the Palais Baccarat was inaugurated in Paris, a former patrician residence completely redesigned by Philippe Starck. The splendid residence, which is located in an elegant square in the 16th arrondissement, houses the boutique, the museum and one of the most exclusive restaurants in the French capital. Place of great charm is open to the public.

It might also interest you:

Baeza, Guillermina

Barbato, Gianni

Barbato, Gianni (1953). Artisan designer, born in Naples. After an apprenticeship with the town’s most famous shoemakers, he started his own business.

Barbato, Gianni (1953). Artisan designer, born in Naples. After an apprenticeship with the town’s most famous shoemakers, he started his own business. He created innovative hand-sewn shoes and used new leathers such as kangaroo, sometimes combining it with as many as twelve other materials, and also ivory horn for the heels. Eclectic, an experimenter, the first to relaunch the cowboy boot, he worked with Sergio Rossi and Fendi. Then he worked with Stuart Weitzman.

His shoes can be found in the most important shops, from Paris to New York and from London to Tokyo, serving a high class clientele. Barbato has opened a company, Serbatoio, and a plant in Civitanova Marche.

It might also interest you:

Barbeau, Serge

Barbisio

Barbisio. Italian hat factory founded in 1862 in Sagliano Micca (Vercelli). Along with Borsalino, it is the most famous brand.

Barbisio. Italian hat factory founded in 1862 in Sagliano Micca (Vercelli). Along with Borsalino, it is the most famous brand. Its men’s hats, all hand-made of soft felt of very fine quality. Moreover they are known by the motto “Barbisio, a name, a brand, a guarantee”. In the 1940s and ’50s, with a return to male elegance inspired by Anglo-Saxon fashion, the hats with a rigid brim met with great success.

Barbisio hats, along with the two other brands controlled by owner Giorgio Borrione, Bantam and Cappellificio Cervo, have a new showroom on via Mazzini in Milan.

At Pitti Uomo the firm presented three different models of Panama hat manufactured in Ecuador using “toquilla”. This is a particular variety of elastic and shiny straw. It is obtained from the leaves of the Carludovica Palmata, or Panama hat palm, a plant typical of Ecuador.

It might also interest you:

Ally Capellino

Baratta, Ubaldo

Baratta, Ubaldo. Italian tailor. At the age of 15 he left his hometown of Salsomaggiore in order to test his abilities in Paris.

Baratta, Ubaldo. Italian tailor. At the age of 15 he left his hometown of Salsomaggiore in order to test his abilities in Paris, at that time the capital of fashion. Ten years working in both large and small ateliers added style and professionalism to his craft. With this experience he moved to London and enrolled at the Minister’s Tailor and Cutter Academy&b;. He then returned to Italy and settled in Montecatini, whose thermal baths were very popular with high society. Among his clients were members of the Royal Family who granted him a royal patent. Eventually, he arrived in Milan where his atelier in via Borgogna became one of the cardinal points on the map of men’s and women’s tailoring.

In 1956 he presented at Palazzo Pitti‘s Sala Bianca in Florence and, later, in Rome. He participated, with dresses made of artificial fibers, in the first meeting of Moda Cinema Teatro (Fashion Cinema Theatre) organized by the Centro delle Arti e del Costume (Center of Arts and Costume) at Palazzo Grassi in Venice. During the 1960s his workshop employed almost 200 tailors. He created a leisure space suit for NASA astronauts and, in the 1970s, uniforms for Alitalia. In 1967 Baratta was one of the first Milanese tailors to join the National Chamber of Italian Fashion. In 1977, by now old, he sold the firm to Loretta Giovani. She furthered his ideas, updating them with the help of a modern and technologically advanced organization. In 1999 the brand was acquired by Gianni Campagna.

It might also interest you:

Baker, Maureen

Barbas, Raymond

Barbas, Raymond (1900-1983). French entrepreneur and president of Jean Patou. He joined in 1920 after his marriage to Marie-Magdaleine.

Barbas, Raymond (1900-1983). French entrepreneur and president of Jean Patou. He joined that Paris fashion house in 1920 after his marriage to Marie-Magdaleine, the founder’s sister. Susanne Lenglen, the six-time Wimbledon champion and dominant player in women’s tennis between 1919 and 1926, owed her entry into the world of fashion to Barbas. After the death of his brother-in-law, management of the business was in his hands. He remained in charge until his own death. Then he was succeeded by his nephew, Jean de Mouy. In the 1950s, at the head of a trade group of manufacturers, Barbas obtained from the government a series of measures meant to invigorate French fashion and the textile industry.

It might also interest you:

Ballantyne Cashmere

Banton, Travis

Banton. His career begins in New York in the fashion houses of Lucile and Madame Frances. Here, in 1920, he created Mary Pickford’s wedding dress.

Banton Travis (1894-1958). American fashion designer and film costume designer. His career began in New York in the fashion houses of Lucile and Madame Frances. In 1920, he designed the wedding dress that Mary Pickford wore when she married Douglas Fairbanks, which introduced him to Hollywood society.

The beginning

His first film sketches were for the femme fatale Pola Negri and for the “It Girl” Clara Bow. Then in 1927 he became chief costume designer for Paramount, a position that, notwithstanding his eccentric behavior, he would maintain until 1938. Less daring than Adrian — his antagonist at MGM — he had a more multi-faceted creativity. Thus, if for Mae West he could caricature in a felicitous way the genre of “1890s burlesque”. For Marlene Dietrich he could invent not only exotic disguises that went to the limits of the absurd (Morocco, 1930, and The Garden of Allah, 1936), but also sophisticated evening outfits (Desire, 1936) and the famous brocade tunic with an undulating skirt (Angel, 1937) which influenced even Schiaparelli and anticipated the New Look. Whereas his creations for Claudette Colbert always had a delicious chic Parisian style, those for Carole Lombard had a cold and impeccable elegance.

Miraculously balanced between the sublime and the ridiculous were the one thousand yards of cock feathers in a thousand shades of black created for the incredible apparation of Dietrich in Shanghai Express (1932), indisputably the icon of Hollywood camp at its highest level.

Banton’s vision

Contrary to Adrian, he aimed to exalt the female figure to the highest, and his period costumes were often confidently anachronistic, more interested in the star’s glamour than historical precision. The costumes of Claudette Colbert in Cleopatra (1934) were a glittering example of this, not really Egyptian but audaciously sexy and an anticipation of today’s nude look, to the point that Banton could be given the credit or the blame for it. His recurrent problem with alcohol forced the end of his contract with Paramount. In 1938 he left his position to his collaborator and protégé Edith Head. Later on he worked for Fox and Universal, but his golden season was over. He is to be remembered for his fanatic attention to details and an obsessive search for perfection.

He remains an example of high professionalism and of creativity that was versatile and controlled in a masterly way.

It might also interest you: 

Banks, Jeff

Banlon

Banlon. A process of adding crimp and stretch to synthetic yarns, developed and patented by the U.S. textile manufacturer Joseph Bancroft & Sons.

Banlon. A process of adding crimp and stretch to synthetic yarns, developed and patented by the U.S. textile manufacturer Joseph Bancroft & Sons. The yarn can be used to make knit or woven fabrics. Moreover it was popular for casually fitted shirts and socks in the 1960s.

Banlon
A polo shirt created with the Banlon technique.

It might also interest you: 

Bagutta

Bangles

Bangles. Inspired by the traditional women’s jewellery of certain African tribes, such as the Masai, who wear them on their arms or around the neck.

Bangles. Inspired by the traditional women’s jewellery of certain African tribes, such as the Masai, who wear them on their arms or around the neck. They are a series of many rigid rings, mostly thin, made of different colors and materials, all mixed together. They are in use in Europe since the beginning of the last century.

It might also interest you:

Baiadera

Banks, Jeff

Banks, Jeff (1943). Famous not only for his griffe, but also for his face: he hosted the only successful program about the world of fashion.

Banks, Jeff (1943). English designer. Famous not only for his griffe, but also for his face: in fact he hosted for British television the only successful program about the world of fashion, The Clothes Show. The show aired on BBC from 1986 to 2000. Banks was born in Wales on March 17, 1943, and then moved to London to study fabric engineering at the Saint Martin’s School of Art. The he pursued his studies at the at New York’s Parsons The New School for Design.

Between 1964 and 1974 he presented his designs at the Clobber boutique, where he sold his clothes alongside those of other young designers. Real success arrived in the second half of the 1970s, when he participated in the opening of the Warehouse chain of stores.

In 2000, he signed a deal to design clothes for the UK chain Sainsbury’s.

In June 2001 the Graduate Fashion Week, an event created by Banks for young talents in fashion, celebrates 10 years of activity. It is one of the most important showcases in the world for new names in fashion, and can attract more than 40,000 visitors. Moreover his event launched Stella McCartney, Antonio Berardi and Alexander McQueen.

It might also interest you:

Dior, Christian

Bandeau

Bandeau. Band of fabric worn on the forehead in order to hold back the hair, and in sports to wipe away sweat. John McEnroe always wears one.

Bandeau. Band of fabric worn on the forehead in order to hold back the hair, and in sports to wipe away sweat. John McEnroe always wears one during his tennis matches, and hippies wore them during the 1960s. The hairdo of the same name, with a part in the middle and smooth bandeau on the sides covering the ears and gathered up at the back of the neck, was made famous by Cléo de Merode. Olivia De Havilland had the same hairdo when playing sweet Melanie in the film Gone With the Wind and also in the film The Heiress, which was based on the novel Washington Square by Henry James.

It might also interest you:

Bandana